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Wikileaks & The Open Internet Coalition

Julian Assange's likely-criminal dissemination of many nations' secret national security information via Wikileaks --  in posting secret, proprietary, and private information that clearly endangers lives, diplomacy and peace -- has exposed one of the darkest sides of the broad open Internet movement, which pushes radical transparency, and general disrespect for secrets, confidentiality, privacy, and intellectual property -- to varying degrees.

  • Assange tries to justify his reckless, irresponsible and destructive acts by claiming to "Keep Governments Open," without bothering to explain the problem his destructive acts are supposed to solve.

It ironic that the Open Internet Coalition is lobbying the FCC hard now to have the Government force Title II telecom utility regulation on private competitive broadband companies in the name of "openness" -- when there is no identifiable or proven problem to solve.

It is especially ironic that leading corporate proponents of the Open Internet Coalition have been so slow to condemn the obvious harm and criminality of Assange's destructive "open" Wikileaks, but are so quick to condemn competitive broadband companies for not being "open" enough -- when the coalition's  definition of "open" is fluid, and when the coalition has no evidence that broadband providers are not being "open."

If it is now so clear that Assange's Wikileaks are a serious problem, why did it take three massive wikileaks over a period of several months for Open Internet member:

 

 

Simply, why is the Open Internet Coalition lobbying so hard to put unnecessary, unjustified, and unwarranted limits on competitive broadband providers reasonable network management, when their biggest members implicitly acknowledge they need the flexibility to reasonably manage their network businesses to deal with emerging Internet threats like Wikileaks?

It is beyond perplexing why there is so much focus to fix a non-existent broadband open Internet problem today, when there is so little focus to fix the most obvious real open Internet problems that have long plagued the Internet.

 


 

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