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See My New Presentation -- Modern Beats Obsolete in Spurring Economic Growth and Innovation

Please see my new power point presentation here entitled: "Modern Beats Obsolete in Spurring Economic Growth and Innovation -- Modernize Obsolete Communications Law and Spectrum Management." It is the culmination of a year of research and presents very powerful evidence of how woefully obsolete and absurdly dysfunctional America's communications policy has become.

This neglected problem has been bipartisan in the making over sixteen administrations and dozens of Congresses. It also will take a long-term bipartisan effort to correct. It will only become increasingly imperative to do so as more and more of our economy and society depends on a fully modern mobile Internet.

After reading this presentation you won't be able to look at current American communications policy in the same way again. America's got a lot of work to do to ensure our leadership in the Internet and high tech continues and is not slowed by the nonsensical and unnecessary drag on investment, innovation and growth of obsolete law and spectrum resource management.

Please don't miss the charts. An outline of the presentation follows:

Obsolete Law & Regulation

 

  • What Makes it Obsolete?
  • FCC Regulation Is an Historical Anomaly
  • How Did This Anomaly Happen?
  • Law Ignores Five Technology Changes
  • Five Ways Law Has Held America Back
  • From Monopoly to Competitive Economics
  • What’s The Harm from Obsolete Law?

 

Obsolete Spectrum Management

 

  • Spectrum Management Is an Historical Anomaly
  • Spectrum Is a Resource Management Outlier
  • Spectrum is the Worst Managed Resource
  • Obvious Waste of Government Spectrum
  • How Did This Anomaly Happen?
  • Why Is U.S. Spectrum Management Dysfunctional?

 

Conclusions

Recommendations

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You can see the Modern Beats Obsolete presentation by clicking here.

In addition, please see the anthology of my Daily Caller Op-ed Obsolete Law series here.

 

Q&A One Pager Debunking Net Neutrality Myths