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FreePress Cries Wolf -- Yet Again

FreePress with its "all complaints all the time" approach to advocacy has been caught once again "crying wolf" when there was no real problem or threat.

A new FCC study that shows ISPs are effectively delivering on the broadband speeds they advertise, exposes FreePress for crying wolf -- yet again.

  • FreePress has to acknowledge Verizon's FIOs far exceeds advertised speeds, Comcast and Charter exceed advertised speeds, and other ISPs are more than close enough to advertised speeds to show that there is not a problem here for the FCC to be concerned about.

FreePress also continues to cry wolf about its spurious tethering" complaint against Verizon because users are prevented from unauthorized tethering of additional devices trying to bypass users' terms of service agreement.

  • FreePress continues to push its bogus charge before the FCC, despite obvious language in the relevant FCC Order that plainly shows that Verizon has the freedom to do what it is doing under the FCC's special 700 MHz rules.
  • See this previous post for the FCC language that proves FreePress is crying wolf here -- yet again.

Remember, FreePress also cried wolf last year with its spurious charges against Comcast for not allowing Level-3/Netflix to game the backbone market by trying to claim net neutrality meant that unregulated backbone peering arrangements should be treated like Title II interconnection agreements.

  • The FCC Chairman made it clear before Congress that the FCC's Open Internet order "doesn't change anything to existing peering arrangements" and that the FCC "hopes those parties settle and resolve it."
  • Freepress was caught crying wolf -- yet again.

In sum, like the proverbial boy who cried wolf  destroyed his credibility by screaming there was a big problem when one did not exist, FreePress has earned its reputation for not being credible by repeatedly claiming broadband actions were problems, when the facts showed they were not.

 

Q&A One Pager Debunking Net Neutrality Myths