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Highlight Video on Modernizing Communications Laws for American Consumers -- A NetCompetition Event

For those interested, please see a nine-minute highlight video of NetCompetition’s April 4th expert panel on making consumers, not technology, the organizing principle of any update of the obsolescing Communications Act.

The experts, Gene Kimmelman of Public Knowledge, Jeff Eisenach, of the American Enterprise Institute, Mark Cooper of the Consumer Federation of America, and Hal Singer of the Progressive Policy Institute, all discussed the merits of making consumers, not technology, the starting point and organizing principle of any update of the Communications Act.

The highlight video of the April 4th event: “Thinking and Starting Anew: Modernizing Communications Law for American consumers” can be found here.

In addition, the highlights of NetCompetition's first event on a Communications Act update, "A Modern Vision for the FCC," can be found here.

This is Part 10 of my Modernization Consensus research series.

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Modernization Consensus Series

Part 1: Implications of Google's Broadband Plans for Competition and Regulation - Part 1 Modernization Consensus Series [1-28-13]

Part 2: Developing Fundamental Consensus for the IP Transition - Part 2 Modernization Consensus Series [1-29-13]

Part 3: Why Europe is Falling Behind America in Broadband - Daily Caller Op-ed -- Part 3 Modernization Consensus Series [2-13-13]

Part 4: Will the New FCC Chair Be a Modernist or Nostalgist? Part 4 Modernization Consensus Series [4-2-13]

Part 5: The FCC Transition - Part 5 Modernization Consensus Series [5-7-13]

Part 6: The Modern FCC Competition-Policy Linchpin - Part 6 Modernization Consensus Series [10-21-13]

Part 7: A Modern Vision for the FCC - New White Paper - Part 7 Modernization Consensus Series [10-31-13]

Part 8: The FCC's IP Transition: Two Key Perspectives - Part 8 Modernization Consensus Series [11-22-13]

Part 9: How to Modernize Communications Law for American Consumers [4-3-14]

 

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